In USA

Doco Weseh

Doco Weseh

Founder / President
Liberia is where I am from; living through the war and missing out on so many opportunities as a child in Liberia, I have decided to step up and give back in a unique fashion. Living in the USA and seeing kids being kids and having all the opportunities provided to them to live out their dreams. I felt the children of Liberia deserve the opportunity to play like other children around the world. Despite the poverty in Liberia, the only thing a child wants is to know they are cared for. Liberia needs a new breed of leaders and it starts from a child being safe and led to the best way of life.

ONE GOAL was founded by a refugee of war, Doco Wesseh. At the age of 10 years old, Doco had to flee for his life and spent nearly a decade living in jungles and refugee camps. When he arrived in the USA, Doco saw how children were able to be free to enjoy their childhood and have opportunities provided to them to live out their dreams. He felt that the children of Liberia deserve the same opportunities to play and dream just like other children around the world. For that reason, he started the ONE GOAL foundation.

Doco’s passion, love and career all revolve around football, but he also realized that education and community involvement are key to the success of Liberia’s youth. He wanted to give Liberian children the chance to play and dream again and his ONE GOAL foundation does just that. Today, ONE GOAL foundation boasts over 1500 youth members, all drawn to join the foundation because of their love of fotball.

Through the amazing sport of football and his ONE GOAL foundation, Doco Wesseh has started a grassroots movement which will positively impact Liberia and Liberia’s children for many years to come. His work is making the world a better place and is a remarkable example of how the power of football changes lives.

Sydney Smith

Sydney Smith

Founder

In 2010, I went to the Julie Foudy Sports Leadership Academy summer camp. They teach girls how to use teamwork and leadership skills on and off the field, how to design service projects and “Choose to Matter”, using their gifts to help those in need. I was 12 years old and didn’t really think I could make a difference, but I had fun at the camp.

Months later, I was approached by Coach Doco who watched me struggle during practice. He offered to show me some moves that I could be successful with. After 45 minutes, I left and he went to coach his own team. The next time I saw him, he asked me to show him what I remembered, and showed me even more moves. When he noticed that I had a new ball, he told me I was very lucky. I said, “I’m not lucky. I scored a goal so I got a new ball.” When he explained that the children of Liberia didn’t have enough soccer balls and that most kids kicked bags of garbage, I immediately (with tears in my eyes) held out my new ball and told him to send it to Liberia. This was the moment that changed my life!

I cleaned out my closets, and then collected gear from my friends and neighbors. By the end of the summer, I had filled a 55-gallon drum with new/used gear for him. He wept, hugged me and told me I had a big heart. Then I learned that Doco’s 750 Liberian Youth Soccer Association kids would share the 26 pairs of used cleats in the barrel, and I was horrified!

Each summer, I returned to the Julie Foudy Sports Leadership Academy camp, and I learned how to make my project grow and found more ways to help me reach my goals. I sat down and decided to make sure every child had their own pair of cleats and their own ball.